Moon Knight episode 1 review: finally Oscar Isaacs Moon Knight episode 1 released

Moon Knight episode 1 review: finally Oscar Isaacs Moon Knight episode 1 released

Moon Knight, directed by Mohamed Diab and created by Jeremy Slater, is unique in that it isn't trying too hard to be distinctive.
Moon Knight episode 1 review: finally Oscar Isaacs Moon Knight episode 1 released
Moon Knight episode 1

Steven Grant (Oscar), a guy who feels he has a mental illness, spends his days working at a museum in London. But the secret is deeper than he realises, and he is the Egyptian Moon God Khonshu's mercenary. It's actually his alter ego Marc Spector aka Moon Knight who is using his body to rescue the planet while he believes he's hallucinating. The first episode depicts the befuddlement and fatal realisation of power, the devil, and his moto.

Moon Knight, directed by Mohamed Diab and created by Jeremy Slater, is unique in that it isn't trying too hard to be distinctive. Moon Knight has the distinct advantage of having no baggage among the series that constrict the world in order to give niche characters a large plot in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. For example, Steve Rogers' departure had an influence on The Falcon and The Winter Soldier, Vision's death resulted in WandaVision, and Loki travelled to the highest realm to solve the puzzle. But, above all, Moon Knight is still trying to figure out where it fits in this universe.

Here's a man who sleeps with his feet tied to a pole so he doesn't sleep walk when "dreaming." He converses with a fish, a man who earns a living by acting as a statue, and even nothing. So it's a big problem when the voices inside him, those of Khonshu, speak to him. The first episode not only acknowledges this man and his heroic status, but also delves into his loneliness and descent into darkness.

The creators use a lot of reflective surfaces surrounding Steven Grant to create the effect of dissociative identity disorder (which is a good thing). As he goes by, he notices the water, mirrors, and even gleaming surfaces. And when they ultimately reveal their role in the series, you're reminded of all the reflections you've seen thus far.

In one of his visions, he is taken to a town in the Swiss Alps, where he meets Arthur Harrow (Ethan Hawke), a cult leader who appears to have magical abilities and operates his own religious society, promising redemption and eternal bliss to his followers. His ultimate goal is to revive Ammit, a demon-goddess and burial deity who was feared by the ancient Egyptians. On behalf of Khonshu, Spector wants to stop him. Grant despises violence and would rather be left alone.

It's the age-old need-to-save-the-world plot concept that underpins practically every superhero narrative. Moon Knight's writing, on the other hand, is more original and intelligent than the typical superhero plot. Even if the two conflicting personas are the outcome of a terrible mental illness, the relationship between them feels natural and enjoyable. Grant is someone you'd want to be friends with for the rest of your life. Spector? You'd be wary of him while secretly wanting he'd be your personal bodyguard. There is a distinct difference between the two alter egos.

Isaac's acting skills come in useful, and it's easy to see why the part attracted to an aspiring artiste like him after seeing this performance, or rather performances. Hawke is consistently and often effortlessly superb as Harrow, charming and terrifying in equal measure.

Moon Knight, the superhero, has a unique design and feel, with a ghostly white clothing and disturbing orb-like eyes, yet the appearance is generally grounded since it isn't drowning in CGI.